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Changes to the Federal Acquisition Regulation’s (FAR) small business subcontracting rules have been slow in coming, but the FAR Council is finally catching up with the Small Business Administration (SBA) in making regulatory modifications to implement a few changes intended to help prime contractors reach their small business subcontracting goals as required by Section 1614 of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2014 (2014 NDAA). Specifically, the changes focus on aiding prime contractors possessing an individual subcontracting plan for a contract with a single executive agency. Now, in such instances, the prime contractor will receive credit toward its subcontracting goals for awards made to small business concerns employed at any tier by subcontractors through their respective subcontracting plans. This should be helpful news to prime contractors.

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Cough…cough…ahem…cough… Any contractor who has had the misfortune of dealing with the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) likely knows all too well that the agency is the Will Rogers of costs – it never met a cost it didn’t question.  Indeed, DCAA auditors typically question costs with reckless abandon and based often on a patent misreading of applicable regulations.  The net effect, of course, is that contractors have to expend significant time and money trying to explain to boards and courts why DCAA’s auditors are…uh…incorrect as a matter of fact and law.  A recent Memorandum for Regional Directors (MRD) provides some transparency into why this sort of thing happens with unfortunate regularity. Issued on May 14, 2019, the MRD (No. 19-PAC-002(R)), corrects…er…“revises” internal guidance issued in 2014 and 2015 relating to the identification of expressly unallowable costs.  The newly issued memo sets out DCAA’s current stance on identifying expressly unallowable costs under the cost principles codified at Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 31 and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) Part 231.  This MRD – like all MRDs – is intended to be used as a tool by well-meaning (but often overzealous) auditors when reviewing a contractor’s compliance with federal cost principles.  Contractors should, thus, pay careful attention to this MRD in order to be prepared for questions that may arise during DCAA-led frolics and detours.

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On Dec. 4, 2018, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council finally released a proposed rule to implement changes to certain small business subcontracting regulations required by the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). 83 Fed. Reg. 62540 (Dec. 4, 2018). This is a welcome, if not long-overdue sign of progress. Over the last half-decade since the

By now, we have all read the horror stories of federal employees who are either furloughed or forced to work without pay during this historic shutdown. Less well-known, however, is the impact this shutdown has had on small business contractors who rely on federal government contracts for much – if not all ‒ of their revenue. Whereas large government contractors may have ample cash reserves for a situation like this, small businesses are likely less fortunate. In fact, many small businesses hire highly skilled, in-demand personnel specifically in support of their government contracts. Unfortunately, with much of the government shuttered and its coffers empty, these highly skilled personnel, and the companies for which they work, find themselves emptyhanded and operating in the red. Absent a stream of revenue, small businesses cannot pay the employees they specifically hired for the contracts that are now unfunded. While many small business contractors have been able to weather the first few weeks of this shutdown by either diverting these employees to other projects or using vacation or sick leave, many thousands of contractors are now facing grim choices as the shutdown enters its fourth week. Simply stated, these companies are in real danger not only of losing those employees hired to support existing contracts, but of losing the opportunity to leverage those employees to compete for future contracts. To make matters worse, unlike federal employees who will likely receive back pay, most if not all contractors will not be reimbursed for the revenue lost during this time of political chicken.

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Buried in a grab bag of seemingly innocuous course-correcting changes to the Bayh-Dole Act regulations (effective May 14 of this year) is the removal by regulators of the sixty-day window between the federal agency’s notice of a contractor/grantee’s failure to give timely notice of inventions in order to secure title and the federal agency’s ability to take title and strip contractors and grantees of what may be their most valuable assets – i.e., their intellectual property. Now the Government is no longer constrained by this time limitation, and it may grab title to inventions conceived or reduced to practice with Government funds at any time should the contractor/grantee fail to follow the rules.

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